Life + Culture

Finding the Person Buried Beneath Family

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As a counselor in ministry for over a decade now, my personal views of therapy have evolved and devolved from time to time. There have been times when, focused on technical issues such a marital conflict, substance abuse and the like, that I have had a clear defining ethic. The Pastor in me wants to meet every challenge with a sometimes crippling, righteous indignation that finds all answers to all things in the context of the Bible. However, upon closer examination I have found that while all global topics may be covered, the intimate, individual person still required a person-to-person connection (Kail & Cavanaugh, 2013). This theory concerning our desire to connect with each other forces me to take a longer, deeper look into the plight and struggle of humanity. Thus, my personal view of therapy finds humanity in need of tools by which one can stay connected to others in society, the work place and within relationships. My philosophical views of therapy are concurrent with my personal one.
In order for someone to change a behavior, they must first recognize it and come to understand the greater question, why? For this reason, rational emotive behavior therapy is a theory by which my practice gains focus into the things that drive people to do and be who they are. The alcoholic drinks. To go beyond the issue and address the philosophical question of why the alcoholic drinks, may offer the struggling addict an understanding of the etiology of their addiction. Through understanding why a person drinks one can then deal with the root rather than the symptom or behavior that follows. At times a person will find the core of their issue inside of them selves. Other times that person may reveal that the root of an issue stems from a family catalyst.
Reference:
Kail, R. V., & Cavanaugh, J. C. (2013). Human development–A life-span view (6th ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth